Work Day = May 23, 2013

Here are a couple of pictures of the boys working this morning on the Goolden Monument. Followed by the finished result at the dedication during the Fall Exhibitioin. The history of the farm acquisition, by the Museum, follows the pictures below.


FIRST PICTURE == Wayne Hill sitting, Ken Tuper standing, and Reggie Chester.

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Monument Honors Goolden-Mann Families

By Roger Austin. From the Sept - Oct 2013 newsletter.

The families of the previous owners-operators of the farm and land now owned by the Museum were honored at a ceremony during the Old Fashioned Harvest Days Exhibition. During the ceremony a monument standing between the flag poles near the front of the Collection Building was unveiled. The generosity of Leon and Carole Goolden in allowing the Museum to acquire the property at less than half its appraised value was inspired in part by their affection for the region and a desire to honor family. The dedication to Leon’s parents and grandparents reads, “In memory of Leon L. Goolden, Sr. and Emma M. Goolden and Fay G. Mann and Maude K. Mann, owners of this family farm spanning a period of over 70 years with faith in God and love of family, farming, and helping others.” The bronze monument is mounted on stone that once flanked the stairs at the front entry of the former Madrid town hall. Upon demolition of the town hall in 1972, these stones were moved next door to the Fay G. Mann Funeral Home where they remained after the business was acquired by Phillips Memorial Home in 1986. David and Linda Frary donated the stones to the Museum earlier this year. President Alan Garrand introduced speakers and guests. Treasurer Charles Goolden related the story of the stones. Secretary Roger Austin reviewed the history of the Museum and the activities related to acquiring the Goolden-Mann property in 2006. Leon Goolden spoke on behalf of his family, recalling the news article about the Museum’s search for a home and how well their property matched the features sought by the Museum. Vice-President Reginald Chester oversaw the unveiling. The bronze and stone monument stands as an attractive reminder of a most important contribution to the success of the Museum.